Book Talk: Pious Irreverence: Confronting God in Rabbinic Judaism with Dov Weiss
Sep
26
7:00 PM19:00

Book Talk: Pious Irreverence: Confronting God in Rabbinic Judaism with Dov Weiss

  • The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies (map)
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Judaism is often described as a religion that tolerates, even celebrates arguments with God. Unlike Christianity and Islam, it is said, Judaism endorses a tradition of protest as first expressed in the biblical stories of Abraham, Job, and Jeremiah. In Pious Irreverence, Dov Weiss has written the first scholarly study of the premodern roots of this distinctively Jewish theology of protest, examining its origins and development in the rabbinic age. Join IIJS for a lively conversation with Dr. Weiss as we discuss his latest book, the winner of the 2017 National Jewish Book Award for scholarship that has been called “not only a scholarly but also a theological gift" by Reviews in Religion & Theology.

Dov Weiss is an Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies in the Department of Religion at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He completed his PhD at the University of Chicago Divinity School as a Martin Meyer Fellow in 2011 and was the Alan M. Stock Fellow at Harvard University’s Center for Jewish Studies in 2012. Specializing in the history of Jewish biblical interpretation and rabbinic theology, Dov’s first book, Pious Irreverence: Confronting God in Rabbinic Judaism (University of Pennsylvania Press),won the 2017 National Jewish Book Award in the category of Scholarship. His recent articles include "Sins of the Parents in Rabbinic and Early Christian Literature" [Journal of Religion 97:1], “Divine Concessions in the Tanhuma Midrashim” [Harvard Theological Review (108:1)] and “The Sin of Protesting God in Rabbinic and Patristic Literature” [AJS Review 39:2].

Additional Information: Seating will be available on a first-come first-served basis. Doors open at 6:45 pm.

Register for this event.

For additional questions, please contact IIJS@columbia.edu.

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Book Talk: Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History by Steven J. Zipperstein
Oct
17
12:00 PM12:00

Book Talk: Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History by Steven J. Zipperstein

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So shattering were the aftereffects of Kishinev, the rampage that broke out in late-Tsarist Russia in April 1903, that one historian remarked that it was “nothing less than a prototype for the Holocaust itself.” In three days of violence, 49 Jews were killed and 600 raped or wounded, while more than 1,000 Jewish-owned houses and stores were ransacked and destroyed. Recounted in lurid detail by newspapers throughout the Western world, and covered sensationally by America’s Hearst press, the pre-Easter attacks seized the imagination of an international public, quickly becoming the prototype for what would become known as a “pogrom,” and providing the impetus for efforts as varied as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and the NAACP. Using new evidence culled from Russia, Israel, and Europe, distinguished historian Steven J. Zipperstein’s wide-ranging book brings historical insight and clarity to a much-misunderstood event that would do so much to transform twentieth-century Jewish life and beyond.

Join IIJS for a lively conversation between Prof. Zipperstein and Prof. Jeremy Dauber as they discuss a book described by Phillip Roth as "a splendid book that pinpoints the moment at the start of the twentieth century when exile in Europe turned deadly in a way that foretold the end of everything. It tells us the horror that occurred street by street, butchery by butchery―with gripping clarity and an admirable brevity.”

Supported by the generosity of the Kaye Family.

Steven J. Zipperstein is the Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish Culture and History at Stanford University. He has also taught at universities in Russia, Poland, France, and Israel; for six years, he taught at Oxford University. For sixteen years he was Director of the Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford. He is the author and editor of eight books including The Jews of Odessa: A Cultural History (1986, winner of the Smilen Prize for the Outstanding book in Jewish history); Elusive Prophet: Ahad Ha’am and the Origins of Zionism (1993, winner of the National Jewish Book Award); Imagining Russian Jewry (1999); and Rosenfeld’s Lives: Fame, Oblivion, and the Furies of Writing(2008, shortlisted for the National Jewish Book Award in Biography, Autobiography and Memoir). His work has been translated into Russian, Hebrew, and French. Zipperstein latest book, Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History,will be published by Liveright/WW Norton in late March 2018.

He has been awarded the Leviant Prize of the Modern Language Association, the Judah Magnes Gold Medal of the American Friends of the Hebrew University, and the Koret Prize for Outstanding Contributions to the American Jewish community. He has held fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University, the Institute for Advanced Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Yitzhak Rabin Institute in Tel Aviv, and has twice been a Visiting Professor at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes Sciences Sociales. In spring 2014, he was the first Jacob Kronhill Scholar at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, in New York.

Zipperstein’s articles have appeared in The New York Times Sunday Book Review, the Washington Post, The New Republic, the Jewish Review of BooksChronicle of Higher Educationand elsewhere. He was editor of the journal Jewish Social Studies for twenty years, and the book series Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture for a quarter of a century. Together with Anita Shapira, he is series editor of the Yale University Press/Leon Black Foundation Jewish Lives series. Zipperstein is the immediate past Chair of the Academic Advisory Council of the Center for Jewish History, in New York and is currently Chair of the Stanford History Department's Graduate Studies Committee.

Additional Information: Seating will be available on a first-come first-served basis. Doors open at 11:45 am. A light kosher lunch will be served.

For additional questions, please contact IIJS@columbia.edu.

 

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Book Talk: Mandatory Separation: Religion, Education, and Mass Politics in Palestine by Suzanne Schneider
Oct
25
7:00 PM19:00

Book Talk: Mandatory Separation: Religion, Education, and Mass Politics in Palestine by Suzanne Schneider

  • The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies (map)
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Is religion a source of political stability and social continuity, or an agent of radical change? This question, so central to contemporary conversations about religion and extremism, has generated varied responses over the last century. Taking Jewish and Islamic education as its objects of inquiry, Mandatory Separation sheds light on the contours of this debate in Palestine during the formative period of British rule, detailing how colonial, Zionist, and Palestinian-Muslim leaders developed competing views of the form and function of religious education in an age of mass politics. Drawing from archival records, school syllabi, textbooks, newspapers, and personal narratives, Suzanne Schneider argues that the British Mandatory government supported religious education as a supposed antidote to nationalist passions at the precise moment when the administrative, pedagogic, and curricular transformation of religious schooling rendered it a vital tool for Zionist and Palestinian leaders. This study of their policies and practices illuminates the tensions, similarities, and differences among these diverse educational and political philosophies, revealing the lasting significance of these debates for thinking about religion and political identity in the modern Middle East. Join IIJS for an insightful conversation with Suzanne Schneider.

Supported by the generosity of the Kaye Family.

Suzanne Schneider received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from the Department of Middle East, South Asian and African Studies at Columbia University. An interdisciplinary scholar working in the fields of history, religious studies, and political theory, Suzanne’s research interests relate to Jewish and Islamic modernism, religious movements in the modern Middle East, the history of modern Palestine/Israel, secularism, and political identity. She is the author of Mandatory Separation: Religion, Education, and Mass Politics in Palestine (Stanford University Press) and a regular contributor to The Revealer: A Review of Religion and Media. She is currently working on a book about religious violence in the modern age. In her capacity as BISR’s Deputy Director, Suzanne oversees program execution, development initiatives, and institutional partnerships.

Additional Information: Seating will be available on a first-come first-served basis. Doors open at 6:45 pm.

For additional questions, please contact IIJS@columbia.edu.

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Populism, Racism, and Antisemitism in the Americas
May
29
7:00 PM19:00

Populism, Racism, and Antisemitism in the Americas

  • Lerner Hall, Room 555, Columbia University (map)
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The Latin American Jewish Studies Association annual conference, co-hosted by The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies and The Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures, presents Populism, Racism, and Antisemitism in the Americas, a keynote lecture by Federico Finchelstein, Professor of History at The New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College and moderated by Katherine Ewing, Professor of Religion and Director of the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life at Columbia University. 

Date: Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Time: 7:00 pm

Location: Lerner Hall, Room 555, 2920 Broadway, Columbia University

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

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Race is defined both as a subjective and objective construct. In Latin America, the Jewish experience of race and racial classification bears the marker of a number of social forces. How Jews experience race and the ramifications associated with racial groupings diverge from the portrayal of Jews across national cultures.

The gap between reality and its representations has always drawn the attention of scholars—from literature and art, to anthropology, sociology, and political history. At various moments, a wide range of sociopolitical forces have sought to widen this gap, calling into question the very possibility of representation (as aesthetic and/or political), while at other moments the very same forces attempted to make this gap invisible, obviating the representational aspect latent in any mode of expression. Our own present moment has reinvigorated the debate about representation, and drawn our attention to the overlapping realms of aesthetic representation and sociopolitical representation.

This year’s regional conference explores the relationship between, on the one hand, how Jews and Judaism are imagined and portrayed in literature, the arts, cinema and popular media and, on the other hand, the complex reality of Jewish socioeconomic, political and cultural life in Latin America. It is in the critical space between representation and reality, or images and realities, that the scholar can better elucidate both aspects of this dynamic.

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Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor
Apr
30
7:30 PM19:30

Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor

  • IIJS, Columbia University, 617 Kent Hall (map)
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Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for a book talk on Letter to My Palestinian Neighbor featuring author Yossi Klein Halevi in conversation with Daniel Bonner, Foreign Policy Fellow, The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies. 

Date: Monday, April 30, 2018

Time: 7:30 pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu by Sunday, April 29. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

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Between Scholarship and Politics: Modern Jewish Studies and the Forgotten Abraham S. Yahuda (1877-1951)
Apr
26
7:00 PM19:00

Between Scholarship and Politics: Modern Jewish Studies and the Forgotten Abraham S. Yahuda (1877-1951)

  • 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University (map)
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Join Columbia University's Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies and Fordham University's Jewish Studies Program for a lecture in the Emerging Voices in Jewish Studies Series, Between Scholarship and Politics: Modern Jewish Studies and the Forgotten Abraham S. Yahuda (1877-1951) with Allyson Gonzalez, Postdoctoral Associate at Yale University, and Emerging Voices in Jewish Studies Award-Winner. 

In the midst of WWI, the Orientalist Abraham S. Yahuda (1877-1951) served as the first chair of Rabbinic Language and Literature at the University of Madrid, Spain’s flagship university. Born in Jerusalem to Baghdadi and German parents, and of distant Sephardi heritage, Yahuda held a chair in Jewish studies more than a decade before both Harry Wolfson (1925) and Salo W. Baron (1930). This talk asks how an important figure like Yahuda has been forgotten, and examines his participation in the complex political and academic worlds that surrounded him.

Date: Thursday, April 26

Time: 7:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu are required by Monday, April 23.  Seating is on a first come, first served basis. 

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I Was Only Kidding!: Jews, Cartoons, and Free Speech
Apr
23
7:00 PM19:00

I Was Only Kidding!: Jews, Cartoons, and Free Speech

  • Pulitzer Hall, World Room, Columbia Journalism School (map)
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Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for I Was Only Kidding: Jews, Cartoons, and Free Speech with Liana Finck, Cartoonist, A Bintel Brief: Love and Longing in Old New York; Ben Katchor, Cartoonist, Julius Knipl, Real Estate PhotographerMiriam Libicki, Graphic novelist, jobnik! Series; Eli Valley, Author, Diaspora Boy: Comics on Crisis in America and Israel, and moderated by Victor Navasky, Author, The Art of Controversy: Political Cartoons and Their Enduring Power.

Date: Monday, April 23

Time: 7:00pm

Location: Columbia Journalism School, Pulitzer Hall, World Room

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu are required, as there is limited space in the venue.  

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Apr
19
6:00 PM18:00

Public Lecture at The Ingeborg, Tamara, and Yonina Rennert Women in Judaism Forum

The Ingeborg, Tamara, and Yonina Rennert Women in Judaism Forum

Professor Elisheva Baumgarten will be giving a public lecture, Towards a Social History of Medieval Jewish Marriage: Finding Individuals within Communities.

Date: Thursday, April 19

Time: 6:00-8:00pm

Lecture followed by reception on Barnard campus (exact room TBD). More details to come.

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German-Jewish Thought and Its Afterlife: A Tenuous Legacy
Apr
18
12:00 PM12:00

German-Jewish Thought and Its Afterlife: A Tenuous Legacy

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Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for German-Jewish Thought and Its Afterlife: A Tenuous Legacy with Vivian Liska, Professor of German Literature, and Director of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University of Antwerp. 

Date: Wednesday, April 18

Time: 12:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

Please RSVP no later than Mon, Apr 16 to iijs@columbia.edu, as a light kosher lunch will be served. 

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Christian Economics and the Jews: Medieval anti-Jewish metaphors and modern economic rationality
Apr
10
12:00 PM12:00

Christian Economics and the Jews: Medieval anti-Jewish metaphors and modern economic rationality

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Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for Christian Economics and the Jews: Medieval anti-Jewish metaphors and modern economic rationality with Giacomo Todeschini, Professor Emeritus of Medieval History, University of Trieste. 

Date: Tuesday, April 10

Time: 12:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

Please RSVP no later than Sunday, April 8 to iijs@columbia.edu, as a light kosher lunch will be served. 

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Film Screening of 1945
Apr
9
7:00 PM19:00

Film Screening of 1945

Columbia's Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies presents a screening of 1945, with an introduction by Annette Insdorf, Professor, Graduate Film Program, Director of Undergraduate Film Studies at Columbia University.

Date: Monday, April 9

Time: 7:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCg3jVRX85A&feature=youtu.be

Please send RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu by April 5. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. 

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Screening of The Ballad of the Weeping Spring
Mar
26
7:00 PM19:00

Screening of The Ballad of the Weeping Spring

  • Columbia University, IIJS, 617 Kent Hall (map)
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The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies presents a screening of The Ballad of the Weeping Spring, a Western-inspired musical drama with an award-winning Mizrahi soundtrack. Comments and Q&A after the film with Gershom Gorenberg, Knapp Adjunct Senior Research Scholar and Adjunct Professor of Journalism. 

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOSSUYs41xc

Synopsis: Yosef Tawila, the legendary tar (lute) player, is running a bar in northern Israel when the son of Avram, his bandmate and best friend, arrives with the news that his father is dying. He brings sheet music for “The Weeping Springtime Symphony,” a piece Yosef and Avram worked on together but never played. Yosef decides to reunite the remaining members of the band to grant his dying friend’s final wish and, perhaps, to heal his own tortured soul. (106 minutes)

Date: Monday, March 26

Time: 7:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall

Please send RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu by March 22. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

You may also join or share our Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1641204592599310/

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The Story of the Jews with Simon Schama
Mar
22
7:00 PM19:00

The Story of the Jews with Simon Schama

Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for an evening lecture nad book talk on BelongingThe Story of the Jews with Simon Schama, University Professor of Art History and History, Columbia University. 

Date: Thursday, March 22

Time: 7:00PM

Location: 617 Kent Hall

Please RSVP to iijs@columbia.edu by Monday, March 19. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. 

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The Naomi Prawer Kadar Annual Memorial Lecture with Eddy Portnoy
Mar
20
6:30 PM18:30

The Naomi Prawer Kadar Annual Memorial Lecture with Eddy Portnoy

Join The Naomi Foundation and the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for the Naomi Prawer Kadar Annual Memorial Lecture on Bad Rabbis, Brawlers, Psychics, and Thieves: Sensationalism in the Yiddish Press with Eddy Portnoy

Date: Tuesday, March 20

Time: light reception at 6:30pm; lecture at 7:30pm

Location: Columbia University Faculty House, 64 Morningside Drive. 

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu required. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. 

About Eddy Portnoy

Eddy Portnoy received his Ph.D. from the Jewish Theological Seminary. A specialist in Jewish popular culture, he has published in numerous academic journals and also in The Forward and in Tablet Magazine. He currently serves as Academic Advisor for the Max Weinreich Center and Exhibition Curator at the YIVO. He is the author of Bad Rabbi and Other Strange but True Stories from the Yiddish Press (Stanford University Press, 2017).

About the Annual Naomi Prawer Kadar Memorial Lecture

The Annual Naomi Prawer Kadar Memorial Lecture provides an opportunity for the public to explore topics of Yiddish language and linguistics, the history of Yiddish, Yiddish children’s literature and education. The lecture is supported by the Naomi Prawer Kadar Foundation, Inc., which is dedicated to reimagining education. As an extension of Naomi Prawer Kadar's life’s work, the foundation's goal is to empower educators and promote leadership in education in order to inspire and nurture the next generation. Through entrepreneurial and established channels and together with their partners and grantees, the Naomi Foundation drives innovation to create meaningful and lasting impact. The Naomi Foundation champions Yiddish, Naomi’s lifelong passion, as a vibrant, rich, and contemporary language. The Naomi Foundation advances the teaching and learning of Yiddish, particularly in academic and scholarly settings.

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The Israel Supreme Court at a Moment of Transition
Mar
7
to Mar 8

The Israel Supreme Court at a Moment of Transition

  • Columbia University, Pulitzer Hall (map)
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* * Wednesday evening only - CANCELLED due to weather * *

 

The Israel Supreme Court at a Moment of Transition: Looking Back, and Looking Forward, with Justices Naor, Rubenstein, and Joubran

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2018 - 8:00PM - CANCELLED due to weather

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2018 - 9:00AM-3:15PM

SPONSORED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR ISRAEL & JEWISH STUDIES AND THE ISRAEL SUPREME COURT PROJECT

HELD AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY (3/7) AND THE CARDOZO SCHOOL OF LAW (3/8)

Last year saw the near simultaneous retirement of the three most senior members of the Israeli Supreme Court.  President Miriam Naor, Deputy President Elyakim Rubenstein, and Justice Salim Joubran all reached the mandatory retirement age of 70.  The departure of these three important justices provides an appropriate moment both to acknowledge and evaluate the jurisprudential contributions of these three Justices and to focus scholarly attention on the Court as a whole.  Marking this unusual juncture in the Court’s evolution, Cardozo’s Israel Supreme Court Project and Columbia’s Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies are joining forces for a two-part conference. 

First, on the evening of March 7, at 8:00 p.m., we will host a panel featuring all three justices in conversation with Michael Stanislawski and Suzanne Stone.  The panel will take place at Columbia University.

The next day, March 8, will feature a day-long academic program at Cardozo, with a series of panels each devoted to a specific opinion (translated into English) by one of the three retiring justices. The Rubenstein panel will focus on his opinion in Ragen v. Ministry of Transport, HCJ 746/07 (January 5, 2011), concerning steps to eliminate gender segregation on public buses.  President Naor wrote the lead opinion for a nine-Justice panel in the well-known case of Desete v. Minister of Interior, HCJ 8665/14 (Aug. 11, 2015), which dealt with the detention and deportation of illegal entrants (or “infiltrators,” as the relevant Hebrew term is usually translated).  The Joubran panel will focus on his dissenting opinion in Adalah Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel v. Minister of Interior, HCJ 7052/03 (May 14, 2006), which upheld a statute that severely limited entrance of Palestinians into Israel even for purposes of family unification.

To register, please click HERE.

CLE credits will be awarded for the March 8 panels.

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Trouble in Turtle Bay: Israel, the United Nations, and International Law
Feb
26
7:00 PM19:00

Trouble in Turtle Bay: Israel, the United Nations, and International Law

Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for a Foreign Policy conversation on Trouble in Turtle Bay: Israel, the United Nations, and International Law featuring Daniel Reisner, former head of the Israel Defense Forces' International Law Division; Israeli peace negotiator; and partner at Herzog Fox Neeman, and Matthew Waxman, Liviu Librescu Professor of Law and Faculty Chair of the National Security Law Program at Columbia Law School in conversation with Daniel Bonner, Foreign Policy Fellow, The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies. 

Date: Monday, February 26, 2017

Time: 7:00 pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu by Thursday, Feb 22. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

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Maimonides' Manuscripts as a Window into his Thought Process with Marc Herman
Feb
21
12:00 PM12:00

Maimonides' Manuscripts as a Window into his Thought Process with Marc Herman

  • Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies (map)
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Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for Maimonides' Manuscripts as a Window into his Thought Process with Marc Herman, the Rabin-Shvidler Joint Post-Doctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies, Columbia University and Fordham University.  

Date: Wednesday, February 21

Time: 12:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

Please RSVP no later than Sun, Feb 18 to iijs@columbia.edu, as a light kosher lunch will be served.

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Yiddish Translation Matters with Anita Norich
Feb
14
12:00 PM12:00

Yiddish Translation Matters with Anita Norich

Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for Yiddish Translation Matters with Anita Norich, Tikva Frymer-Kensky Collegiate Professor and Adjunct Professor, Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies, Columbia University. 

Date: Wednesday, February 14

Time: 12:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

Please RSVP no later than Sun, Feb 11 to iijs@columbia.edu, as a light kosher lunch will be served. 

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Film Screening of The Promised Band
Feb
12
7:00 PM19:00

Film Screening of The Promised Band

The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies presents a screening of the documentary The Promised Band, followed by Q&A with director & Columbia alumna Jen Heck and band member Viki Auslender. 

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/231490577

Synopsis: The Promised Band is the story of a fake rock band comprised of Israeli and Palestinian women who have decided that, despite their dubious musical talent, a music group is the best cover story to meet and interact with each other. Aided by a naive but well-meaning American TV producer, our unlikely musicians have to cross borders, secure permits to travel, and find safe spaces to practice and perform. Although their societies are kept apart, the women connect on their sameness, and their lives become entangled in ways they couldn't expect. (89 mins)

Date: Monday, February 12, 2018

Time: 7:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall

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An evening with Sayed Kashua (including a screening of The Writer)
Feb
6
7:00 PM19:00

An evening with Sayed Kashua (including a screening of The Writer)

  • Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies, 617 Kent Hall (map)
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Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for an evening with novelist and screenwriter Sayed Kashua, including a screening of The Writer.  

Date: Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Time: 7:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

Please RSVP no later than Monday, Feb 5 to iijs@columbia.edu. Seating available on a first come, first served basis. 

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Canon and Commentary: Rashi's Resisting Readers
Feb
5
12:00 PM12:00

Canon and Commentary: Rashi's Resisting Readers

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Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for Canon and Commentary: Rashi's Resisting Readers with Eric Lawee, Shoshana Shier Distinguished Visiting Professor, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto; and Associate Professor, Department of Bible, Bar Ilan University. 

Date: Monday, February 5, 2018

Time: 12:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

Please RSVP no later than Thurs, Feb 1 to iijs@columbia.edu, as a light kosher lunch will be served. 

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Jack Lew on Smart Power: Reflections on America in an Unstable World
Dec
11
7:30 PM19:30

Jack Lew on Smart Power: Reflections on America in an Unstable World

  • Columbia University, 501 Schermerhorn (map)
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Join the IIJS for a Foreign Policy Series conversation on Smart Power: Reflections on America in an Unstable World with Jacob J. Lew, Visiting Professor of International and Public Affairs, SIPA; Former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury; and Former White House Chief of Staff in conversation with Daniel Bonner, IIJS Foreign Policy Fellow.

Date: Monday, December 11th, 2017

Time: 7:30 pm

Location: 501 Schermerhorn, Columbia University

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu by Friday, December 8. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

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The Ruined House with Ruby Namdar
Dec
6
8:00 PM20:00

The Ruined House with Ruby Namdar

  • Columbia University, 617 Kent Hall (map)
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Join the IIJS for an evening book talk on The Ruined House with author and Israel's Sapir Prize winner Ruby Namdar in conversation with Clemence Boulouque, Carl and Bernice Witten Assistant Professor of Jewish and Israel Studies

Date: Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Time: 8:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Books will be available for sale after the lecture.

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The Origin of the Jews: From Genesis to Genetics
Dec
4
12:00 PM12:00

The Origin of the Jews: From Genesis to Genetics

  • Columbia University, 617 Kent Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join the IIJS for a lunchtime lecture on The Origin of the Jews: From Genesis to Genetics with Steven Weitzman, Abraham M. Ellis Professor of Hebrew and Semitic Languages and Literatures and Ella Darivoff Director of the Katz Center of Advanced Judaic Studies, University of Pennsylvania

Date: Monday, December 4th, 2017

Time: 12:00 pm

Location617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu byThursday, Nov 30 as a light, kosher lunch will be served.

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The Graduate: A 50th Anniversary Celebration (Part 2)
Nov
30
7:00 PM19:00

The Graduate: A 50th Anniversary Celebration (Part 2)

  • Columbia University, Pulitzer Hall (map)
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Columbia's Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies presents with the Support of the Film Division of Columbia's School of the Arts a celebration of the 50th anniversary of

The Graduate

Join a Special Panel Discussion

Thursday, November 30

7-8:30pm

Pulitzer Lecture Hall - 3rd floor of Journalism School

featuring:

Maura Spiegel, Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

Mark Harris, Author, Pictures at a Revolution and Five Came Back

Shari Springer Berman, Writer and Director, American Splendor and Girl Most Likely

*Please RSVP separately for each event*. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu are required for admission.

Synopsis: One of the most beloved American films of all time, The Graduate earned Mike Nichols a Best Director Oscar, brought the music of Simon & Garfunkel to a wider audience, and introduced the world to a young actor named Dustin Hoffman. Benjamin Braddock (Hoffman) has just finished college and is already lost in a sea of confusion and barely contained angst when he becomes sexually involved with his parents’ friend, the indomitable Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft), before turning his attention to her college-age daughter (Katharine Ross). Visually imaginative and impeccably acted, with a clever, endlessly quotable script by Buck Henry (based on the novel by Charles Webb), The Graduate has the kind of cultural impact that comes along only once in a generation. (RT: 106 min)

the graduate poster - poster version - revised.jpg
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The Graduate - A 50th Anniversary Celebration (Part 1)
Nov
29
7:00 PM19:00

The Graduate - A 50th Anniversary Celebration (Part 1)

  • Columbia University, 511 Dodge Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Columbia's Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies presents with the Support of the Film Division of Columbia's School of the Arts a celebration of the 50th anniversary of

The Graduate

See the restored film in 4K HD projection

Wednesday, November 29

7pm

511 Dodge Hall

Comments & discussion to follow the screening

*Please RSVP separately for each event* Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu are required for admission.

Synopsis: One of the most beloved American films of all time, The Graduate earned Mike Nichols a Best Director Oscar, brought the music of Simon & Garfunkel to a wider audience, and introduced the world to a young actor named Dustin Hoffman. Benjamin Braddock (Hoffman) has just finished college and is already lost in a sea of confusion and barely contained angst when he becomes sexually involved with his parents’ friend, the indomitable Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft), before turning his attention to her college-age daughter (Katharine Ross). Visually imaginative and impeccably acted, with a clever, endlessly quotable script by Buck Henry (based on the novel by Charles Webb), The Graduate has the kind of cultural impact that comes along only once in a generation. (RT: 106 min)

the graduate poster - poster version - revised.jpg
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Meet a Yiddish Celebrity: Irena Klepfisz
Nov
28
8:00 PM20:00

Meet a Yiddish Celebrity: Irena Klepfisz

Meet a Yiddish Celebrity: An Evening with Award-Winning Poet and Activist Irena Klepfisz.

Tuesday, November 28th, 2017

8:00 pm, Deutsches Haus at Columbia University

420 W. 116th St. (between Amsterdam Ave. and Morningside Dr.)

Dr. Irena Klepfisz is a Yiddish poet, writer, activist, academic, translator and the recipient of the 2016 Adrienne Cooper Dreaming in Yiddish Award. She is the author of A Few Words in the Mother Tongue, Dreams of an Insomniac: Jewish Feminist Essays, Speeches, and Diatribes, and co-editor of The Tribe of Dina: A Jewish Women’s Anthology, and Jewish Women’s Call for Peace: A Handbook for Jewish Women on the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict. She served for many years as Yiddish editor for Bridges magazine and has been a long-time activist whose work addressed homophobia in the Jewish community, women and peace in the Middle East, and secular Jewish identity. She taught for 10 years at Bedford Correctional Facility for Women and has been teaching Jewish Women’s Studies for 30 years at Barnard College.

Irena is coming to meet Columbia Yiddish students and community to talk about her life as a Yiddish celebrity.  

The event is free and open to the public. In Yiddish and English. Rugelekh will be served. Questions? Email Agi Legutko at abl2109@columbia.ed

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Cultural Criticism as a Jewish Practice and its Beginnings in the Bible1:
Nov
15
1:00 PM13:00

Cultural Criticism as a Jewish Practice and its Beginnings in the Bible1:

  • Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join the Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies for Cultural Criticism as a Jewish Practice and its Beginnings in the Bible, a lunchtime lecture with Ed Greenstein, Professor of Bible, Bar Ilan University. 

Date: Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Time: 1:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

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Lioness: Golda Meir and the Nation of Israel with Francine Klagsbrun
Nov
13
7:30 PM19:30

Lioness: Golda Meir and the Nation of Israel with Francine Klagsbrun

  • 310 Fayerweather Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join the IIJS for an evening book talk on "Lioness: Golda Meir and the Nation of Israel" with Francine Klagsbrun, moderated by Daniel Bonner, Foreign Policy Fellow, Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies. 

Date: Monday, November 13, 2017

Time: 7:30pm

Location: 310 Fayerweather Hall, Columbia University

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu no later than November 9. Books will be available for sale after the lecture.

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Screening of Complicit
Nov
9
6:00 PM18:00

Screening of Complicit

  • 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join the IIJS for a screening of "Complicit," the award-winning film about the S.S. St Louis, followed by a conversation with Sonja Geismar and Eva Wiener, survivors of the St. Louis, moderated by filmmaker and director, Robert Krakow

Date: Thursday, November 9, 2017

Time: 6:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

Space is limited, so RSVPs required to iijs@columbia.edu no later than November 6

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What You Did Not Tell: A Russian Past and the Journey Home
Nov
8
6:00 PM18:00

What You Did Not Tell: A Russian Past and the Journey Home

  • 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join the IIJS for an evening book talk on "What You Did Not Tell: A Russian Past and the Journey Home" with Mark Mazower, Ira D. Wallach Professor of History, Columbia University and moderated by Elissa Bemporad, Jerry and Willam Ungar Chair in Eastern European Jewish History and the Holocaust, Associate Professor, Queens College. 

Date: Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Time: 6:00pm

Location: 617 Kent Hall, Columbia University

RSVPs to iijs@columbia.edu no later than November 6. Books will be available for sale after the lecture.

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